BEST SUPPORTING PERFORMANCE: CHRISTOPH WALTZ - DJANGO UNCHAINED

Among a category overflowing with worthy performances (See my addendum at the bottom of the page for more), Christoph Waltz the prize.  
Waltz is endlessly entertaining as dentist/bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz, creating a lovable killer and delivering Quentin Tarantino's
absurd, hilarious dialog with perfection.

BEST SOUND MIXING: BRAVE

Nothing new here.  Pixar films regularly receive reference quality mixing and Brave is no exception.  Dialog, music and effects are perfectly
placed, delivering a dynamic sound that is never overbearing.  Brave was also the debut film for the new Dolby Atmos surround system.

BEST SOUND EDITING: PROMETHEUS

Prometheus is an incredible aural experience.  From thunderous engines to furious silica storms and scavenging mapping drones,
Prometheus is a consistent showcase for inventive sound effects work, much of it shaking the very foundations of the theater.  This is an
intense work that always heightens immersion and lends a terrifying weight to every threat.

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS: THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY

As one would expect, Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is a VFX showcase.  Impressive environments and set pieces (The goblin
caves, the thunder battle) and some superb digital character work (The improved Gollum, The Goblin King) highlight another visual treat.

BEST MAKEUP: THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY

Whether it be dwarves, hobbits or wizards, you won't find a better work of hair, prosthetics or special effects makeup work.

BEST SCORE: JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND - Andrew Lockington

Pick up your monocles everyone!  Journey 2 has won a Greggy!  Sometimes you have to go with your heart over your head and Andrew
Lockington's thrilling adventure score was simply too wondrous to ignore.  Complete with soaring themes and exotic vocals and
orchestration, this is a masterful slice of orchestral adrenaline and surprising beauty.

BEST FILM EDITING: ZERO DARK THIRTY

Zero Dark Thirty is a gripping combination of drama, thrills and action thanks in no small part to great editing.  It does it all in a lofty
157-minutes, but never drags or loses its intensity.  The buildup and execution of the famous operation during the film's finale is most
impressive.

BEST COSTUME DESIGN: DJANGO UNCHAINED

It would have won thanks to Django's blue suit alone, but Sharen Davis'  work was great all-around.  We are proud to give her a Greggy after
an embarrassing Oscars.com website glitch revealed her as a nominee...even though she wasn't.

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: SKYFALL

Roger Deakins is no stranger to awards and his work on Skyfall shows that nobody does it better.  His gorgeous, moody photography is a
visual treat.  The noir opening shot, the neon lights of Shanghai and the bleak, color-bled climax resonate both dramatically and artistically.  
This is also the first digitally-shot picture I have ever seen that perfectly replicates the granular look and detail of traditional film stock.

BEST ART DIRECTION: PROMETHEUS

We have come to expect first-rate production design from Sir Ridley Scott, but Prometheus overcomes even those standards.  Despite its
obvious ties to Alien, Arthur Max and company deliver a unique and visually-arresting work of art.  Everything from ship and creature
design to the incredible atmosphere of planet LV-223 and the ruins of its previous inhabitants is eye-popping; immersing the audience in
this beautiful and terrifying world.  Dariusz Wolski's brilliant cinematography helps too.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY: ARGO - CHRIS TERRIO

Gripping, dramatic and unexpectedly funny; Argo is not just adaptation at its best, but screenwriting at its finest.  Chris Terrio's work is an
incredible blend of historical thriller, character drama and comedy.  It's unclassifiable and unquestionably extraordinary.

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY: SKYFALL - JOHN LOGAN AND NEAL PURVIS &
ROBERT WADE

Those who write off Skyfall from major consideration might want to get their glasses checked.  This is a masterful piece of entertainment.  
Director Sam Mendes assembles a brilliant cast and crew and Bond veterans Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, along with the brilliant John
Logan, deliver an exceptional screenplay.  It introduces a style and dramatic edge this series has never seen while still paying wonderful
tribute to the 007 legacy.

BEST PERFORMANCE: DANIEL DAY-LEWIS - LINCOLN

I doubt many would disagree that Daniel Day-Lewis is one of the finest actors in the history of cinema.  His performance as Abraham Lincoln
may be his best work yet.  Day-Lewis is outstanding; playing one of the greatest figures in American history with wonderful subtlety, humor,
thoughtfulness and devotion.  As the title indicates, this performance is the very fabric of the film and Day-Lewis once again astounds.

BEST DIRECTOR: BEN AFFLECK - ARGO

With Gone Baby Gone, The Town and now Argo, Ben Affleck has solidified himself as a formidable director.  Argo is his finest work yet.  As
mentioned in my praise of its screenplay above, this is a multi-faceted film that triumphs on many levels.  As director, Affleck does a
masterful job of weaving the various tones and threads into a cohesive whole; each part brilliantly complimenting the others.  The cast is
uniformly excellent and Affleck's camera work (while not without style) is appropriately subtle, allowing the great work of his cast and crew
to shine.  In this regard, Affleck is not just a good director, but a great storyteller.

BEST PICTURE: ARGO

Argo is a brilliant film that does everything right.  It's tense, dramatic and surprisingly funny.  Affleck presents this piece of history with
great attention to detail while still delivering wonderful characters and wit.  Chris Terrio's screenplay is exceptional and the performances
are unquestionable (Including an award-worthy one from Alan Arkin as a cynical Hollywood film producer).  Whenever I give out this award, I
look for the film that most exemplifies the reason I love the film medium.  No film does that better than Argo.


For my final thoughts and discussion:
click here...
THE 2013 GREGGY AWARDS
It's common knowledge that Liam Neeson was originally cast as Abraham Lincoln in Steven Spielberg's
adaptation.  However, few know that Greg was originally cast as Union Soldier 7 before being asked to
leave the production following a heated confrontation with Daniel Day-Lewis.  Sources say Greg held an
ironic grudge against Day-Lewis for killing Neeson in the opening of Gangs of New York.